Research

PCTC’s mission includes funding science & engineering research to better understand and improve safety, health and environmental performance. Publications resulting from PCTC-funded research are listed on this page.

Post Publication Peer Reviews

Over the past decade, PCTC has commissioned many reviews of papers published in science journals about pavement sealants. These kinds of reviews, formally called Post Publication Peer Reviews (PPPR),  are essential to understanding the study that is being reviewed. With science, understanding the details of a study is essential to evaluating whether the conclusions reached by the authors of the paper are supported by the details. PCTC makes the PPPRs available on this web site. PPPRs are key to replicating the studies, to designing new studies to gain additional scientific insight as well as to accurate communications about the studies. In an effort to make the PPPRs more widely available to the science community, PCTC summarizes the reviews at PubPeer.com, a PPPR web site used by scientists to discuss papers published in science journals. PubPeer postings to date are listed below. Scientists and others interested in the PubPeer postings can follow the links.

Crane, J. L. (2014a). Source Apportionment and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Risk Considerations, and Management Implications for Urban Stormwater Pond Sediments in Minnesota, USA. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol, 66, 176-200. doi:10.1007/s00244-013-9963-8

Kienzler, A., Mahler, B. J., Van Metre, P. C., Schweigert, N., Devaux, A., & Bony, S. (2015). Exposure to runoff from coal-tar-sealed pavement induces genotoxicity and impairment of DNA repair capacity in the RTL-W1 fish liver cell line. Science of The Total Environment, 520(0), 73-80. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.03.005

Mahler, B. J., Ingersoll, C. G., Van Metre, P. C., Kunz, J. L., & Little, E. E. (2015). Acute Toxicity of Runoff from Sealcoated Pavement to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas. Environmental Science & Technology. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.5b00933

Mahler, B. J., P. Van Metre, T. J. Bashara, J. T. Wilson, and D. A. Johns, 2005, Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of Urban Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Environmental Science & Technology, v. 39, p. 5560 – 5566.

Mahler, B. J., Van Metre, P., Wilson, J. T., Musgrove, M., Burbank, T. L., Ennis, T. E., & Bashara, T. J. (2010). Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: an unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust. Environmental Science & Technology, 44, 894 – 900. doi:10.1021/es902533r

Scoggins, M., McClintock, N. L., Gosselink, L., & Bryer, P. (2007). Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons below coal-tar-sealed parking lots and effects on stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Journal of the North American Benthological Society, 26(4), 694-707. doi:10.1899/06-109.1

Van Metre, P., Mahler, B., & Wilson, J. (2009). PAHs underfoot: contaminated dust from sealcoated pavements is widespread in the United States. Environ Sci Technol, 43, 20-25.

Van Metre, P., & Mahler, B. J. (2010). Contribution of PAHs from coal–tar pavement sealcoat and other sources to 40 U.S. lakes. Science of the Total Environment, 409, 334 – 344. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.08.014

Van Metre, P. C., & Mahler, B. J. (2014). PAH Concentrations in Lake Sediment Decline Following Ban on Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas. Environmental Science & Technology. doi:10.1021/es405691q

Van Metre, P., Majewski, M. S., Mahler, B., Foreman, W. T., Braun, C. L., Wilson, J. T., & Burbank, T. L. (2012a). Volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar-sealed pavement. Chemosphere, 88(1), 1 – 7. doi:doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.12.072

Van Metre, P. C., Majewski, M. S., Mahler, B. J., Foreman, W. T., Braun, C. L., Wilson, J. T., & Burbank, T. L. (2012b). PAH volatilization following application of coal-tar-based pavement sealant. Atmospheric Environment, 51, 108-115. doi:doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.01.036

Watts, A. W., Ballestero, T. P., Roseen, R. M., & Houle, J. P. (2010). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Stormwater Runoff from Sealcoated Pavements. Environmental Science & Technology, 44, 8849 – 8854. doi: 10.1021/es102059r

Williams, E. S., Mahler, B. J., & Van Metre, P. (2013). Cancer Risk from Incidental Ingestion Exposures to PAHs Associated with Coal-Tar-Sealed Pavement. Environmental Science & Technology, 47, 1101 – 1109. doi:dx.doi.org/10.1021/es303371t

Witter, A. E., Nguyen, M. H., Baidar, S., & Sak, P. B. (2014). Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: A major PAH source to urban stream sediments. Environmental Pollution, 185(0), 59-68. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2013.10.015

 

Publications in Peer Reviewed Science Journals

Letter to the Editor of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management in response to Dr. Jared Bales (Chief Scientist for Water, US Geological Survey).
Author: Anne LeHuray
Citation: LeHuray, A. (2015), In response to Bales (2014). Integr Environ Assess Manag, 11: 185–187. doi: 10.1002/ieam.1619
Summary: In a Letter to the Editor, Bales explains that it is USGS policy not to advocate for policy positions. In her response, LeHuray lauds the policy, but explains that some within the USGS have not adhered to the policy in either their research or communications about RTS.

Comment on “PAH Concentrations in Lake Sediment Decline Following Ban on Coal-Tar-Based 1 Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas”
Authors: Robert P. DeMott and Thomas D. Gauthier
Citation: DeMott, RP, Gauthier, TD (2014). Comment on “PAH Concentrations in Lake Sediment Decline Following Ban on Coal-Tar-Based 1 Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas”. Environmental Science & Technology DOI: 10.1021/es5046088.

Comment on “Coal-tar pavement sealant use and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in urban stream sediments”
Authors: Thomas D. Gauthier and Robert P. DeMott
Citation: Gauthier, T.D. and DeMott, R.P. (2014). Comment on “Coal-tar pavement sealant use and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in urban stream sediments.” Physical Geography. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02723646.2014.981779

Use of Receptor Models to Evaluate Sources of PAHs in Sediments.
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly, Sungwoo Ahn, Jaana Pietari and Paul Boehm
Abstract: Receptor models are mathematical procedures for resolving one or more of these parameters in a mixed chemical system: 1) the number of sources, 2) their chemical characteristics, and 3) the relative contribution of each source in environmental samples. These models are being used increasingly to evaluate sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments. As with any mathematical model, understanding the underlying assumptions is critical in interpreting the output. Three assumptions that raise particular challenges when applying receptor models to evaluate multiple sources of pyrogenic PAHs are 1) identification of all important sources, 2) stability of source profiles, and 3) linear independence of each profile. Variability within source types, and similarities among the PAH profiles of different sources, create uncertainties that must be considered when evaluating the results of receptor models. Various procedures for evaluating uncertainties have been applied in the literature, but validation and standardization of such methods are often lacking. Using a case study, this paper demonstrates how a more detailed evaluation of model output can produce conclusions that differ from those initially published. While not eliminating uncertainty, we recommend a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach that includes both mixing and unmixing receptor models, along with other environmental forensic techniques.
Citation: O’Reilly, K., Ahn, S., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2015). Use of Receptor Models to Evaluate Sources of PAHs in Sediments. Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds. 35:1, 41-56.

Letter to the Editor concerning Crane (2014) “Source apportionment and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, risk considerations, and management implications for urban stormwater pond sediments in Minnesota, USA.”
Author: Kirk O’Reilly
Abstract: This letter to the editor explains why the results presented in “Crane (Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 66:176–200, Crane 2014)” does not support the hypothesis that refined tar sealers (RTS) are a significant source of PAHs in urban sediments. Additional analysis of Crane’s data indicates that sediment chemistry can be explained in the absence of RTS.
Citation: O’Reilly, K. (2014). Letter to the Editor. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. DOI: 10.1007/s00244-014-0094-7.

Author’s Reply to Van Metre and Mahler’s Comment on “Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy.”
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly; Jaana Pietari; Paul Boehm
Key Points:
– When properly applied, receptor models and other forensic methods can be useful tools for investigating PAH sources.
– Although there are published reports of using receptors models such as EPA’s Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) to characterize potential sources of PAHs responsible for the background profile associated with urban sediments, the results are sensitive to the model conditions and subject to high uncertainty.
– Even though Van Metre and Mahler (2010) claimed to use CMB to test the Mahler hypothesis, only the results of 4 runs that appeared consistent with the hypothesis were discussed in detail.
– A more complete evaluation indicates that CMB results do not support the hypothesis.
– When used to support source control policy, scientists must describe the receptor model results and associated uncertainties in a way that is understood by nontechnical decision makers.
Citation: O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2014). Author’s Reply to Van Metre and Mahler’s Comment on “Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy.” Integr Environ Assess Manag. 10(4):489-491. DOI:10.1002/ieam.1556.

Author’s Reply to Crane’s Comment on “Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy.”
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly; Jaana Pietari; Paul Boehm
Key Points:
•Dr. Crane raises a number of interesting points, but these serve to support not distract from, the conclusions of our paper.
•Without independent verification that the source inputs used are appropriate and sufficient, the results of EPA’s Chemical Mass Balance Model (CMB) cannot be used to verify the contribution of a given source.
•Neither Van Metre and Mahler’s (2010) nor Crane’s (2014) use of CMB demonstrates whether refined tar sealers are actually a source in any urban sediment.
•When using the results of receptor models to promote source control policy, care must be taken to clarify the underlying assumptions and uncertainty.
Citation: O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2014). Author’s Reply to Crane’s Comment on “Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy.” . Integr Environ Assess Manag. 10(3):325–326. DOI:10.1002/ieam.1548

Comment on “Cancer Risk from Incidental Ingestion Exposures to PAHs Associated with Coal-Tar-Sealed Pavement”
Authors: Brian Magee and Janet Keating-Connolly
Citation: Magee, Brian and Janet Keating-Connolly (2013). Comment on “Cancer Risk from Incidental Ingestion Exposures to PAHs Associated with Coal-Tar-Sealed Pavement”. Environmental Science & Technology, 48 (1), pp 868–869

Response to authors’ reply on “Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: A major PAH source to urban stream sediments”
Author: Kirk O’Reilly
Citation: O’Reilly, K. (2014). Response to authors’ reply on “Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: A major PAH source to urban stream sediments.” Environmental Pollution 191:264-265.

Article title misstates the role of pavement sealers
Author: Kirk O’Reilly
Citation: O’Reilly, K. (2014). Article title misstates the role of pavement sealers. Environmental Pollution 191:260-261
Abstract: The claim made in the title of Witter et al. (2014) “Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: A major PAH source to urban stream sediments” is not supported by the data presented. The author’s use of Pearson correlation coefficients is insufficient to indicate causation. The application of spatial analysis and principle component analysis did not include sealer specific inputs, so provides no basis for the claim. To test the hypothesis that sealers are a source of PAHs in the stream studied, EPA’s Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source evaluation model was applied to Witter’s sediment data. CMB found an excellent fit (R2 > 0.999) between measured and modeled PAH concentrations when sealers were not included as a potential source. This finding does not support Witter et al. (2014) claim that sealers are a major source of PAHs.

Parsing pyrogenic PAHs: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly; Jaana Pietari; Paul Boehm
Citation: O’Reilly, K. T., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. D. (2014), Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy. Integr Environ Assess Manag, 10(2): 279–285
Abstract:A realistic understanding of contaminant sources is required to set appropriate control policy. Forensic chemical methods can be powerful tools in source characterization and identification, but they require a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach. Atmospheric receptor models, such as EPA’s Chemical Mass Balance (CMB), are increasingly being used to evaluate sources of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments. This paper describes the assumptions underlying receptor models and discusses challenges in complying with these assumptions in practice. Given the variability within, and the similarity among pyrogenic PAH source types, model outputs are sensitive to specific inputs, and parsing among some source types may not be possible. While still useful for identifying potential sources, it is critical that the technical specialist applying these methods describe both the results and their inherent uncertainties in a way that is understandable to non-technical policy makers.

We present an example case study concerning an investigation of class of parking-lot sealers as a significant source of PAHs in urban sediment. In this paper, principal component analysis is used to evaluate published CMB model inputs and outputs. Targeted analyses of two areas where bans have been implemented are included. The results do not support the claim that parking-lot sealers are a significant source of PAHs in urban sediments. Integr Environ Assess Manag © 2013 SETAC

A Forensic Assessment of Coal Tar Sealants as a Source of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Urban Sediments
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly; Jaana Pietari; Paul Boehm
Citation: O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2012). A Forensic Assessment of Coal Tar Sealants as a Source of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Urban Sediments. Environmental Forensics, 13:185-196.
Abstract: Atmospheric deposition of particles and their subsequent transport by stormwater are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban sediments. Recently, the results of forensic analysis have been used to promote a hypothesis that refined tar-based pavement sealers (RT-sealers) are another significant source. To evaluate this hypothesis, a suite of forensic methods was applied to a wider range of PAH data for this study. Sediments PAH profiles are no more similar to RT-sealers than they are to a number of other environmental inputs. While RT-sealers were not eliminated as a potential source in some locations, forensic methods did not differentiate their contribution from other sources of PAHs, indicating RT-sealers are not a unique or readily quantifiable source of PAHs to the urban environment.

Comment on “PAHs Underfoot: Contaminated Dust from Coal-Tar Sealcoated Pavement is Widespread in the U.S.”
Authors: Kirk O’Reilly; Jaana Pietari; Paul Boehm
Citation: O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2011). Comment on “PAHs Underfoot: Contaminated Dust from Coal-Tar Sealcoated Pavement is Widespread in the U.S.” Environ. Sci. Technol., 2011, 45 (7), pp 3185–3186

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Austin Sediments After a Ban on Pavement Sealers
Authors: Robert P. DeMott; Thomas D. Gauthier; James M. Wiersema; Geoffrey Crenson
Citation: DeMott, R.P., Gauthier, T.D., Wiersema, J.M. and Crenson, G. (2010). PAHs in Austin Sediments after a Ban on Pavement Sealers. Environmental Forensics, 11:4, 372-382.
Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations were measured in stream sediments collected before and after a municipal ban on the use of coal-tar-based pavement sealers in Austin, Texas. Samples were collected in October 2005, prior to the ban, and again in April, 2008, approximately 2 years after the ban. Differences in total PAH concentrations between samples collected before and after the ban show no net change in PAH levels in Austin stream sediments. Results of hydrocarbon fingerprinting reveal subtle differences in PAH profiles that appear to reflect the effects of weathering rather than a change in PAH sources.

Comment on “Parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of urban polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons”
Authors: Robert P. DeMott; Thomas D. Gauthier
Citation: DeMott, R.P.; Gauthier,T.D. (2006) Comment on “Parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of urban polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.” Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40(11), 3657-3658

Study Evaluation Reports

Volatilization of PAHs from Coal-Tar-Sealed Parking Lots
ENVIRON reviewed studies of PAH volatilization from sealcoated parking lots published the USGS in two papers. As has been found in other work by the same USGS authors, effects have been exaggerated and uncertainties have been minimized to make it falsely appear that lots sealed with refined tar-based sealant are the dominant source of PAHs released to the atmosphere. ENVIRON concludes Based on our analysis, we find that the two papers recently published by Van Metre and coworkers (2012) overstate the volatilization of PAHs from coal tar sealers. These papers employ a set of modeling assumptions and experimental study design approaches that consistently bias their findings to overestimate PAH volatilization from sealed parking lots.
Citation: Environ (2013). Volatilization of PAHs from Coal-Tar-Sealed Parking Lots. Report prepared for the Pavement Coatings Technology Council. 46 p.

Peer Review of Coal-Tar-Sealed Pavement Risk Assessment
ARCADIS peer review of RTS risk assessment that appeared in 2013. The paper authored by Williams and others asserts that the presence of refined tar-based pavement sealants is associated with significant increases in estimated cancer risks for residents living adjacent to sealed paved surfaces. ARCADIS’ evaluation finds that no such association has been established between residents living adjacent to sealed paved surfaces, and no increases in estimated cancer risks above regulatory levels of concern have been established. ARCADIS’ peer review critically evaluates the data and risk assessment methods described in the Williams and others paper, and also provides context missing in the Williams and others paper by presenting information about how much PAHs people are typically exposed to from multiple sources of exposure to PAHs in the environment.
Citation: ARCADIS (2013). Peer Review of Coal-Tar-Sealed Pavement Risk Assessment. Report prepared for the Pavement Coatings Technology Council. 17 p. Available at http://www.pavementcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Peer-Review-CTS-Report_Revised2.pdf

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Characteristics for Sediments Collected from Creeks and Streams in Austin, Texas
Environ report on study of sediments collected in Austin, TX in 2005 before the City’s ban on refined tar-based sealant went into effect. Sediments were sampled from many of the same locations were collected again in 2008. Results of the “before and after” study were subsequently published in DeMott et al. (2010).
Citation: Environ (2006). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon(PAH)Characteristics for Sediments Collected from Creeks and Streams in Austin, Texas. Report prepared for the Pavement Coatings Technology Center. 63 p. Available at http://www.pavementcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/PCTC-sediment-report_optimize.pdf, plus Appendices available at http://www.pavementcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/PCTC-sediment-report-Appendices.pdf

Review of “Coal-Tar-Based Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of PAH to Settled House Dust” by Mahler et al., published in Environmental Science and Technology, January 2010
Environ review of the settled house dust study. This review served as the core of a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA). The review remains incomplete because, as of July 2013, only a part of the requested data has been delivered.
Citation: Environ (2010). Review of “Coal-Tar-Based Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of PAH to Settled House Dust” by Mahler et al., published in Environmental Science and Technology, January 2010. Report prepared for the Pavement Coatings Technology Council. 18 p.

PavementCouncil.org White Papers

PCTC White Paper 1301: CRITICAL REVIEW OF USGS CONCLUSIONS REGARDING SOURCES OF PAHs IN LAKE SEDIMENTS

Presentations at Meetings of Science Societies

LeHuray, A. (2015). White Hat Bias in the Environmental Sciences. Presentation at the 36th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Salt Lake City November 5, 2015.

The 2015 WHB presentation is also discussed in a blog post, here.

O’Reilly, K. and Ahn, S. (2014). Mass Balance Modeling of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Sources to Urban Sediments. Presentation at the 35th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Vancouver, BC November 10, 2014.

Ahn, S. and O’Reilly, K. (2014). The influence of source selection on Chemical Mass Balance modeling results: Implications for source control policy. Presentation at the 35th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Vancouver, BC November 10, 2014.

LeHuray, A. (2014). PAHS are Rarely Causes of Impairment in U.S. Clean Water Act Section 303(D) Reports. Presentation at the 35th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Vancouver, BC November 10, 2014.

Mudge,Stephen, K. O’Reilly, S. Ahn, J. Pietari and P. Boehm (2013) Receptor Models for PAH Source Characterisation: Opportunities and Limitations Presentation at the 2013 annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

Pietari, J., Ahn, S., O’Reilly, K. and Boehm, P. (2013) Parsing Pyrogenic PAHs— Urban Background or Refined Tar Products? Presentation at the 29th Annual International Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water and Energy. Oct. 21-24, 2013. Amherst, Massachusetts.

O’Reilly, K., Ahn, S., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2013). Use of Receptor Models to Evaluate Sources of PAHs in Sediments. Presentation at the 24th meeting of the International Symposium on Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (ISPAC 2013) in Corvallis, Oregon USA September 8-12, 2013.

Magee, B., Keating-Connolly, Janet and Hoeger, Glenn (2013). Risk Assessment for Coal Tar-Based Pavement Sealants. Presentation at the 24th meeting of the International Symposium on Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (ISPAC 2013) in Corvallis, Oregon USA September 8-12, 2013.

O’Reilly K, Pietari J and Boehm P. (2012). Use of Alkyl Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Data in Evaluating the Contribution of Pavement Sealers to Urban Sediments. Abstract and Platform Presentation at the 2012 annual meeting of the Society of Environment Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC).

Feldpausch, A. and Schoof, R. (2012) Development of a residence-specific, health-based screening criterion for benzo(a)pyrene in indoor dust. Abstract of presentation at the 2012 annual meeting of the International Society of Exposure Science.

LeHuray, A.P. (2012). Bans of Pavement Sealers Have Demonstrably Absent Environmental Risk Reduction Benefits but Foreseeable and Knowable Economic Harms. Managing for a Healthy and Sustainable Chesapeake Bay: Human and Ecological Risk: Joint Meeting of the National Capital Area Chapters of the Society of Environment Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA). College Park, MD, April 23-24, 2012

O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2011). Managing Risks: Will banning pavement sealers have the desired effect? Abstract and Poster Presented at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Environment Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Boston, Nov. 2011.

DeMott, R.P. and Gauthier, T.D. (2011). Use of Mass Balance Bounding Estimates and Sensitivity Analysis to Prioritize PAH Inputs in Urban Systems. Abstract and Poster Presented at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Environment Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Boston, Nov. 2011.

Pietari, J., O’Reilly, K. and Boehm, P. (2011). Environmental Forensics for PAH Source Management: Pavement Sealants and Sediments. Abstract and Poster Presentated at the Sixth International Conference on Remediation of Contaminated Sediments, New Orleans, LA Feb. 2011.

O’Reilly, K., Pietari, J. and Boehm, P. (2010 ). PAHs in Urban Sediments: Forensics Approaches for Assessing the Relative Contribution of Atmospheric Deposition. Abstract and Platform Presentation at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society of Environment Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Seattle, Nov. 2010.

Gauthier, T.D. and DeMott, R.P. (2008). Analysis of PAH Concentrations Detected in Austin Texas Stream Sediments Following a Ban on the Use of Coal Tar Sealers. Abstract and presentation at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Tampa, Nov. 2008.